Abstract

Abstract

Abstract

Ultrafast imaging is presently attracting immense research interesting on the global level due to its powerful ability for studying space-time dynamics in photonic materials, plasma physics, living cells, and neural activity. Pushing the imaging speed to the quantum limit could reveal extraordinary scenes about the questionable quantization of life and intelligence, or the wave-particle duality of light. However, previous designs of ultrafast photography are intrinsically limited by framing speed and spatial resolution. Here, we introduce a new technique based on a multiple non-collinear optical parametric amplifier principle (MOPA), which readily push the frame rate into the area of ten trillion frames per second with higher eigen spatial resolution than 30 line pairs per millimeter, which has no intrinsic limitations of imaging speed from outside but only limitations due to optical devices such as laser and non-linear crystal film. Furthermore, its spatial resolution is high enough, which can make it possible and significative to study and further analyze the details of targeted object on the level.
The key feature of MOPA is that the framing time, only dependent on the relative delays of the pump beams and independent of the exposure time and number of frame, can reach tens of femtosecond. The other feature is that it can obtain a high spatial resolution by optimizing the spatial frequency bandwidth of OPA. Consequently, it has been applied to record the femtosecond early evolution of laser-induced plasma grating in air for the first time, at 7.5×10¹² fps with higher eigen spatial resolution than 30 lp/mm in our experiment.

TitleSingle-shot all-optical ultrafast imaging at ten trillion frames per second with high-resolution
ImageImage
Image caption

The image shows our experimental setup for the MOPA imaging to get four sequentially images in a single-shot.

First nameJingzhen
Last nameLi
Affiliation

Institute of Photonic Engineering, College of Electron Sci. & Tech., Shenzhen University; Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Micro·Nano Photonic Information, Shenzhen, 518060, China

Additional authors
Session10. Sensors and cameras I
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